A statistical jump in the mortality rate of expectant and new mothers over 40 is “biologically implausible,” according to the co-author of a new study.

A startling spike in recent years in the number of Texas women dying as a consequence of pregnancy or childbirth has spurred a furious debate over whether deep funding cuts to reproductive health services are to blame.

A peer-reviewed study published in the quarterly journal Birth could add a new dimension to the argument. It attributes part, though not all, of the increase in Texas’ maternal mortality rate—which is among the highest of any state—to a statistical mirage caused by misreporting on death certificates.

The number of women who are dying during pregnancy, or soon after giving birth, has risen nationwide, and a new report shows an alarming 87% spike in deaths in Texas. As of 2015, the maternal mortality rate in Texas is 32.5 per 100,000 live births, and the increase accounts for around 50 to 60 additional deaths per year in Texas.

“We think there is a very significant problem in Texas,” says Marian MacDorman, a research professor at the Maryland Population Research Center at the University of Maryland, College Park, and the lead author of the new study, published in the journalBirth.


Early adoption will bring huge psychological and physical benefits for the adopted children, and increase their chances of developing into healthy and productive adults.


India has proposed changing the law that governs adoption in order to fast-track court clearances, which often delays the process by more than two years. The proposed amendment to the Juvenile Justice Act of 2015 empowers district courts to declare children legally free for adoption, moving away from the busy courts of civil magistrates, which struggle with backlogs of pending cases and rarely prioritise adoption. The move is expected to bring the time taken per adoption down to about two months.

Improving maternal and child health has been one of the greatest global challenges, as recognized in the United Nations Sustainable Development Goals 2 and 3 for 2025.

These problems are not limited to low- and middle-income countries. The United States has been experiencing worsening trends in maternal mortality rates. In fact, the U.S. has the highest maternal mortality rate in the industrialized world, and about half of pregnancies in the U.S. are unplanned, with low spacing between births.

Who would have thought that in 2017, countries would be gathering to seek solutions on maternal health? Who would have thought that a man would still be dictating his wife’s choice of contraception? Who would have thought we would still have hundreds of girls whose sex inception was not by choice, but by forced marriage or cultural fiat?

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Kantor

Pusat Kebijakan dan Manajemen Kesehatan (PKMK)
Fakultas Kedokteran, Kesehatan Masyarakat dan Keperawatan (FKKMK)
Universitas Gadjah Mada

Gd. IKM Baru Lt. 2, Sayap Utara
Jl. Farmako Sekip Utara Yogyakarta 55281

Telp: (+62274) 549425

Email: unitpublikasi@gmail.com

Dies MMR & PKMK